Daily Archives: January 9, 2018

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue

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by Emma Donoghue
Overall: 5 out of 5 stars

Sumac Lottery comes from a large family – 7 kids (she’s #5) and 4 parents. The parents, two homosexual couples of various races and ethnicities, were already close friends when they won the lottery and decided to buy a mansion and acquire all their kids (some through adoption, some through other means – IVF? it’s a bit unclear). Despite their wealth, they are very environmentally-minded and don’t buy a lot of extra things just because. The story starts when one of the grandparents, the one living that none of the kids knows, comes to live with them. He is very conservative and racist and clashes a lot with his son’s family and quickly earns the nickname Grumps. He displaces uber-helper Sumac from her room and thus begins her internal struggle. Grumps is deeply unhappy about all the changes in his life and takes them out on the family, but also comes around eventually (even being rescued from the airport where he’s attempting to get back to his old home).

From the beginning, I was expecting this one to be too over the top about the hippy-dippy diversity, but it actually worked. I had a really, really hard time connecting to the fact that this book took place in Toronto – I had gotten it into my head that they lived in Hawaii! (I think because their house sounded a lot like the 13-Story Treehouse.) The kids are all homeschooled and are named after trees; eventually they mostly crystallized but I felt like some details were missing (like Sic’s name came from a tree somehow but I missed how – maybe Sycamore? And another kid is just straight up named Wood?). Probably details of their births and races and even intellectual abilities/disabilities were omitted to show that they’re not really important to Sumac, but it didn’t help me understand her family.

The one thing that irked me was that the four-year-old sibling, whose original name was Briar, decided they wanted to be called Brian and not be called a girl throughout the story (though at the end they claimed to be a brother and a sister to their siblings), and the rest of the family kept referring to them as she. While this seemed necessary to create confusion for the grandfather and make one particular scene work, it seemed both insensitive generally and also out of character for this family in particular, which is so diverse and perfectly accepting in all other ways.

It reminded me of The Family Fletcher in noise level and busyness, too, so if you liked that one, you’ll probably like the Lotterys! I spent a while looking to see if this was the second book in a series, since it seems to jump right into an established story, but it doesn’t appear to be the case. (Though the author’s website indicates it’s to be the first in a series, so I guess stay tuned!)